Archive for the ‘M Stars’ Category

Antares, Alpha Scorpii, spectrum

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 22nd August 2010 in M Stars, M Stars, Spectroscopy, Stars
Here we have Antares spectrum in three flavors. The first one is a general view, the second is a infra-red view and the third a bit of details in the middle of spectrum. The reference star is M1iii and is in purple. My spectrum is in green / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /

Comparing Lacaille 8760 and 9352 Type M stars spectra

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 15th August 2010 in M Stars, M Stars, Spectroscopy, Stars

Lacaille 8760 (Microscopium) M2Ve Spectrum

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 15th August 2010 in M Stars, M Stars, Spectroscopy, Stars
Although it is slightly too faint to be seen without a telescope, this star is one of the nearest to our Sun at about 12.9 light years distance. This star was originally listed in a 1763 catalog that was published posthumously by the French Abbé Nicolas Louis de Lacaille. He observed this star in the southern sky while working from an observatory at theCape of Good Hope. / / / /In the past this star has been classified anywhere from spectral class K7 down to M2. In 1979 the Irish astronomer Patrick Byrne discovered that this is a flare star, and it was given the variable star designation AX Microscopii. As a flare star it is relatively quiet, only erupting on average less than once per day. / / / /This star orbits around the galaxy in an elliptical orbit with a relatively high ellipticity of 0.23. Its closest approach to the Sun occurred about 20,000 years ago.[citation needed] Due to its low mass (60 % of our Sun), this star has an expected lifespan of about 7×1010 years, it’s 7 times more than for our own Sun. / / / /Despite efforts by astronomers, thus far no planets have been detected in orbit around this star. / / / /Although Lacaille 8760 is the brightest red dwarf star visible in the night sky, it’s still too dim to be seen with the naked eye. It is also one of the largest and brightest red dwarf stars known with about 60% the mass and 66% the radius of the Sun. / / / /Below is the CCD synthetic spectrum / / / / / / / /Then we have the standard M2v in purple and the actual spectrum in green. / / / / / / / /And a reference M3 spectrum / / / /

Lacaille 9352 (Piscis Austrinus) M2/M3V Spectrum

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 15th August 2010 in M Stars, M Stars, Spectroscopy, Stars
This is also known as Gliese 887 and is a star very near our solar system. It is a deep red dwarf, magnitude 7.3. / / / /Below we see the synthetic CCD spectrum / / / / / / / /The reference spectrum is in yellow and the actual spectrum obtained is in purple. Not special care was done in calibration, but we can see clearly the Na line and the H-Alpha / / / / / / / /Below a reference M1 star lines / / / /