Archive for the ‘Universe’ Category

NGC 253

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 31st December 2016 in Galaxies, Images, Recent Posts, Universe
A test image of NGC253. 50cm reflector and ASI1600MM. Sloan griz

ngc253color

Galaxy Cluster Abell 1689 with a 50cm reflector

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 29th May 2016 in Galaxy Clusters, Images, Recent Posts, Universe
Compared with DSSII and Hubble. We can notice parts of gravitational lens
abell1689
 

NGC5128 50cm Reflector

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 28th May 2016 in Galaxies, Images, Recent Posts, Universe
NGC5128

Supernova in M66 ASASSN-16fq (=SN 2016cok)

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 28th May 2016 in Galaxies, Images, Recent Posts, Stars, Supernova, Universe
comparison

M83

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 7th May 2016 in Galaxies, Images, Universe
80×10 seconds ASI174MM 20 in reflector M83 ASI174MM

Antennae Galaxies in Corvus

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 2nd April 2016 in Galaxies, Recent Posts, Universe
Telescope : RC10
CCD : Orion 8300, StarlightXpress FW, LRGB, 300sx5

Antennae

Anatennaetab

The Antennae Galaxies are undergoing a galactic collision. Located in the NGC 4038 group with five other galaxies, these two galaxies are known as the Antennae Galaxies because the two long tails of stars, gas and dust ejected from the galaxies as a result of the collision resemble an insect’s antennae. The nuclei of the two galaxies are joining to become one giant galaxy. Most galaxies probably undergo at least one significant collision in their lifetimes. This is likely the future of our Milky Way when it collides with the Andromeda Galaxy.
Five supernovae have been discovered in NGC 4038: SN 1921A, SN 1974E, SN 2004GT, SN 2007sr and SN 2013dk.[4]
A recent study finds that these interacting galaxies are less remote from the Milky Way than previously thought—at 45 million light-years instead of 65 million light-years.[5]
They are located 0.25° north of 31 Crateris and 3.25° southwest of Gamma Corvi.[6] Timeline
About 1.2 billion years ago, the Antennae were two separate galaxies. NGC 4038 was a barred spiral galaxy and NGC 4039 was a spiral galaxy. Before the galaxies collided, NGC 4039 was larger than NGC 4038.[citation needed] 900 million years ago, the Antennae began to approach one another, looking similar to NGC 2207 and IC 2163. 600 million years ago, the Antennae passed through each other, looking like the Mice Galaxies. 300 million years ago, the Antennae’s stars began to be released from both galaxies. Today the two streamers of ejected stars extend far beyond the original galaxies, resulting in the antennae shape. Within 400 million years, the Antennae’s nuclei will collide and become a single core with stars, gas, and dust around it.[citation needed] Observations and simulations of colliding galaxies suggest that the Antennae Galaxies will eventually form an elliptical galaxy.[7] X-ray source
Areas containing large amounts of neon, magnesium, and silicon were found when the Chandra X-ray Observatory analyzed the Antennae Galaxies. These elements are necessary in order for planets that may contain life to form. The clouds imaged contain 16 times as much magnesium and 24 times as much silicon as the Sun.

Quasar PKS2000-330 in Sagittarius

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 8th February 2016 in Images, Quasars, GRB, Recent Posts, Universe

pks2000330Technical card


Imaging telescope or lens: TPO 10″ f/8 Ritchey–Chrétien Truss
Imaging camera: Orion Parsec 8300
Mount: Losmandy G11
Guiding camera: QHYCCD QHY5L-II Color
Focal reducer: TPO 0.75X
Filter: Baader Planetarium R,G,B 36mm

Resolution: 2504×3326
Dates: June 14, 2015
Frames: 5×300″
Avg. Moon age: 26.83 days
Avg. Moon phase: 8.05%
RA center: 300.900 degrees
DEC center: -32.838 degrees
Pixel scale: 0.759 arcsec/pixel

Description

It is marked with an arrow at the image. PKS 2000-330 (also known as QSO B2000-330) is a quasar located in the constellation Sagittarius. When identified in 1982, it was the most distant and most luminous object known. The “distance” of a far away galaxy depends on what distance measurement you use. With a redshift of 3.77,[2] light from this active galaxy is estimated to have taken around 11.7 billion years to reach us.[2] But since this galaxy is receding from Earth at an estimated rate of 274,681 km/s[1] (the speed of light is 299,792 km/s), the present (co-moving) distance to this galaxy is estimated to be around 22.7 billion light-years (6947 Mpc)

Centaurus A galaxy

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 8th February 2016 in Galaxies, Images, Recent Posts, Universe

NGC 253 Sculptor Barred Galaxy

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 31st August 2014 in EBA - Alto Paraíso, Galaxies, Recent Posts

NGC 1365 Barred Spiral Galaxy in Eridanus

Posted by Paulo Cacella on 31st August 2014 in EBA - Alto Paraíso, Galaxies, Recent Posts